There is a clear unmet need for an effective, well-tolerated therapy to address the physiologic and symptomatic effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). Apnimed is among the first companies seeking to develop oral medications to address the underlying biology of this life-altering illness.

Groundbreaking research at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston paved the way for a pharmacologic treatment of OSA. This work suggested that a once-daily medication taken at night to treat OSA could be a powerful new treatment option in place of continuous positive air pressure devices, often known as CPAP. Apnimed has built upon this exciting research and is leading the way in the development of new pharmacologic treatments to be offered to a broad range of patients with OSA.

ObSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

Developing a disease-modifying treatment

Once-daily, oral medications for sleep apnea would constitute a major advance

ObSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

Developing a disease-modifying treatment

There is a clear unmet need for an effective, acceptable therapy to address the physiologic and symptomatic effects of OSA. Apnimed is among the first companies seeking to develop pharmacologic therapies for this life altering illness.

Groundbreaking research at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston has paved the way for a pharmacologic treatment of OSA. This work indicated the potential for a once-daily medication taken at night to treat OSA in place of continuous positive air pressure devices, often known as CPAP. Apnimed is expanding upon this exciting research and is leading the way in the development of new pharmacologic treatments for patients to be offered to a broad range of patients with OSA.

Opening a blocked airway

Addressing the underlying biology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

In OSA the muscles that maintain an open upper airway collapse repeatedly during sleep, resulting in intermittent hypoxemia (low oxygen levels), sleep disruption and long-term cardiac and metabolic morbidity and mortality. Sleep-related muscular relaxation is the key neurological issue leading to OSA – patients suffering from OSA do not experience airway obstructions while awake, even while lying down. In patients with OSA, sleep onset leads to a reduction in neuromuscular control of the upper airway and a corresponding relaxation of the upper airway and tongue muscles. By targeting the neurological control and reactivation of upper airway dilator muscles, we can potentially address the cause of the disease, improve respiration and oxygenation during sleep, and reduce the number of harmful comorbidities associated with OSA.